Posts Tagged ‘data portability’

Comments on Richard Thaler “Show Us the Data. (It’s Ours, After All.)” NYT 4/23/11

Tuesday, April 26th, 2011

Professor Richard Thaler, a professor from the University of Chicago wrote a piece in the New York Times this weekend with an idea that is dear to CDP’s mission: making data available to the individuals it was collected from.

Particularly because the title of the piece suggests that he is saying exactly what we are saying, I wanted to write a few quick comments to clarify how it is different.

1. It’s great that he’s saying loudly and clearly that the payback for data collection should be the data itself – that’s definitely a key point we’re trying to make with CDP, and not enough people realize how valuable that data is to individuals, and more generally, to the public.

2. However, what Professor Thaler is pushing for is more along the lines of “data portability”, the idea of which we agree with at an ethical and moral level, has some real practical limitations when we start talking about implementation. In my experience, data structures change so rapidly that companies are unable to keep up with how their data is evolving month-to-month. I find it hard to imagine that entire industries could coordinate a standard that could hold together for very long without undermining the very qualities that make data-driven services powerful and innovative.

3. I’m also not sure why Professor Thaler says that the Kerry-McCain Commercial Privacy Bill of Rights Act of 2011 doesn’t cover this issue. My reading of the bill is that it’s covered in the general sense of access to your information – Section 202(4) reads:

to provide any individual to whom the personally identifiable information that is covered information [covered information is essentially anything that is tied to your identity] pertains, and which the covered entity or its service provider stores, appropriate and reasonable-

(A) access to such information; and

(B) mechanisms to correct such information to improve the accuracy of such information;

Perhaps what he is simply pointing out is the lack of any mention about instituting data standards to enable portability versus simply instituting standards around data transparency.

I have a long post about the bill that is not quite ready to put out there, and it does have a lot of issues, but I didn’t think that was one of them.

 

In the mix…philanthropic entities, who’s online doing what, data brokers, and data portability

Monday, July 5th, 2010

1) Mimi and I are constantly discussing what it means to be a nonprofit organization, whether it’s a legal definition or a philosophical one.  We both agree, though, that our current system is pretty narrow, which is why it’s interesting to see states considering new kinds of entities, like the low-profit LLC.

2) This graphic of who’s online and what they’re doing isn’t going to tell you anything you don’t already know, but I like the way it breaks down the different ways to be online.  (via FlowingData) At CDP, as we work on creating a community for the datatrust, we want to create avenues for different levels of participation.  I’d be curious to see this updated for 2010, and to see if and how people transition from being passive userd to more active userd of the internet.

3) CDT has filed a complaint against Spokeo, a data broker, alleging, “Consumers have no access to the data underlying Spokeo’s conclusions, are not informed of adverse determinations based on that data, and have no opportunity to learn who has accessed their profiles.” We’ve been wondering when people would start to look at data businesses, which have even less reason to care about individuals’ privacy than businesses with customers like Google and Facebook.  We’re interested to see what happens.

4) The Data Portability Project is advocating for every site to have a Portability Policy that states clearly what data visitors can take in and take out. The organization believes “a lot more economic value could be created if sites realized the opportunity of an Internet whose sites do not put borders around people’s data.” (via Techcrunch)  It definitely makes sense to create standards, though I do wonder how standards and icons like the ones they propose would be useful to the average internet user.


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