Posts Tagged ‘DNA’

In the mix…DNA testing for college kids, Germany trying to get illegally gathered Google data, and the EFF’s privacy bill of rights for social networks

Friday, May 21st, 2010

1) UC Berkeley’s incoming class will all get DNA tests to identify genes that show how well you metabolize alcohol, lactose, and folates. “After the genetic testing, the university will offer a campuswide lecture by Mr. Rine about the three genetic markers, along with other lectures and panels with philosophers, ethicists, biologists and statisticians exploring the benefits and risks of personal genomics.”

Obviously, genetic testing is not something to take lightly, but the objections quoted sounded a little paternalistic. For example, “They may think these are noncontroversial genes, but there’s nothing noncontroversial about alcohol on campus,” said George Annas, a bioethicist at the Boston University School of Public Health. “What if someone tests negative, and they don’t have the marker, so they think that means they can drink more? Like all genetic information, it’s potentially harmful.”

Isn’t this the reasoning of people who preach abstinence-only sex education?

2) Google recently admitted they were collecting wifi information during their Streetview runs.  Germany’s reaction? To ask for the data so they can see if there’s reason to charge Google criminally.  I don’t understand this.  Private information is collected illegally so it should just be handed over to the government?  Are there useful ways to review this data and identify potential illegalities without handing the raw data over to the government?  Another example of why we can’t rest on our laurels — we need to find new ways to look at private data.

3) EFF issued a privacy bill of rights for social network users.  Short and simple.  It’s gotten me thinking, though, about what it means that we’re demanding rights from a private company. Not to get all Rand Paul on people (I really believe in the Civil Rights Act, all of it), but users’ frustrations with Facebook and their unwillingness to actually leave makes clear that the service Facebook is offering is not just a service provided to just a customer.  danah boyd has a suggestion — let’s think of Facebook as a utility and regulate it the way we regulate electric, water, and other similar utilities.


Get Adobe Flash player