Posts Tagged ‘open data’

Comments on Richard Thaler “Show Us the Data. (It’s Ours, After All.)” NYT 4/23/11

Tuesday, April 26th, 2011

Professor Richard Thaler, a professor from the University of Chicago wrote a piece in the New York Times this weekend with an idea that is dear to CDP’s mission: making data available to the individuals it was collected from.

Particularly because the title of the piece suggests that he is saying exactly what we are saying, I wanted to write a few quick comments to clarify how it is different.

1. It’s great that he’s saying loudly and clearly that the payback for data collection should be the data itself – that’s definitely a key point we’re trying to make with CDP, and not enough people realize how valuable that data is to individuals, and more generally, to the public.

2. However, what Professor Thaler is pushing for is more along the lines of “data portability”, the idea of which we agree with at an ethical and moral level, has some real practical limitations when we start talking about implementation. In my experience, data structures change so rapidly that companies are unable to keep up with how their data is evolving month-to-month. I find it hard to imagine that entire industries could coordinate a standard that could hold together for very long without undermining the very qualities that make data-driven services powerful and innovative.

3. I’m also not sure why Professor Thaler says that the Kerry-McCain Commercial Privacy Bill of Rights Act of 2011 doesn’t cover this issue. My reading of the bill is that it’s covered in the general sense of access to your information – Section 202(4) reads:

to provide any individual to whom the personally identifiable information that is covered information [covered information is essentially anything that is tied to your identity] pertains, and which the covered entity or its service provider stores, appropriate and reasonable-

(A) access to such information; and

(B) mechanisms to correct such information to improve the accuracy of such information;

Perhaps what he is simply pointing out is the lack of any mention about instituting data standards to enable portability versus simply instituting standards around data transparency.

I have a long post about the bill that is not quite ready to put out there, and it does have a lot of issues, but I didn’t think that was one of them.

 

In the mix…Facebook “breach” of public data, data-mining for everyone, thinking through the Panton Principles, and BEST PRACTICES Act in Congress

Friday, July 30th, 2010

1) Facebook’s in privacy trouble again. Ron Bowes created a downloadable file containing information on 100 million searchable Facebook profiles, including the URL, name, and unique ID.  What’s interesting is that it’s not exactly a breach.  As Facebook pointed out, the information was already public.  What Facebook will likely never admit, though, is that there is a qualitative difference between information that is publicly available, and information that is organized into an easily searchable database.  This is what we as a society are struggling to define — if “public” means more public than ever before, how do we balance our societal interests in both privacy and disclosure?

2) Can data mining go mainstream? The article doesn’t actually say much, but it does at least raise an important question.  The value of data and data-mining is immense, as corporations and large government agencies know well.  Will those tools every be available to individuals?  Smaller businesses and organizations?  And what would that mean for them?  It’s a big motivator for us at the Common Data Project — if data doesn’t belong to anyone, and it’s been collected from us, shouldn’t we all be benefiting from data?

3) In the same vein is a new blog by Peter Murray-Rust discussing open knowledge/open data issues, focusing on the Panton Principles for open science data.

4) A new data privacy bill has been introduced in Congress called “Building Effective Strategies to Promote Responsibility Accountability Choice Transparency Innovation Consumer Expectations and Safeguards” Act, aka “BEST PRACTICES Act.”  The Information Law Group has posted Part One of FAQs on this proposed bill.

Although the bill is still being debated and rewritten, some of its provisions indicate that the author of the bill knows a bit more about data and privacy issues than many other Congressional representatives.

  • The information regulated by the Act goes beyond the traditional, American definition of personally identifiable information.  “The definition of “covered information” in the Act does not require such a combination – each data element stands on its own and may not need to be tied to or identify a specific person. If I, as an individual, had an email address that was wildwolf432@hotmail.com, that would would appear to satisfy the definition of covered information even if my name was not associated with it.”
  • Notice is required when information will be merged or combined with other data.
  • There’s some limited push to making more information accessible to users: “covered entities, upon request, must provide individuals with access to their personal files.” However, they only have to if “the entity stores such file in a manner that makes it accessible in the normal course of business,” which I’m guessing would apply to much of the data collected by internet companies.

Common Data Project looking for a partner organization to open up access to sensitive data.

Wednesday, June 30th, 2010

Looking for a partner...

The Common Data project is looking for a partner organization to develop and test a pilot version of the datatrust: a technology platform for collecting, sharing and disclosing sensitive information that provides a new way to guarantee privacy.

Funders are increasingly interested in developing ways for nonprofit organizations to make more use of data and make their data more public. We would like to apply with a partner organization for a handful of promising funding opportunities.

We at CDP have developed technology and expertise that would enable a partner organization to:

  1. Collect sensitive data from members, donors and other stakeholders in a safe and responsible manner;
  2. Open data to the public to answer policy questions, be more transparent and accountable, and inform public discourse.

We are looking for an organization that is both passionate about its mission and deeply invested in the value of open data to provide us with a targeted issue to address.

We are especially interested in working with data that is currently inaccessible or locked down for privacy reasons.

We can imagine, in particular, a couple of different scenarios in which an organization could use the datatrust in interesting ways, but ultimately, we are looking to work out a specific scenario together.

  • A data exchange to share sensitive information between members.
  • An advocacy tool for soliciting private information from members so that organizational policy positions can be backed up with hard data.
  • A way to share sensitive data with allies in a way that doesn’t violate individual privacy.

If you’re interested in learning more about working with us, please contact Alex Selkirk at alex [dot] selkirk [at] commondataproject [dot] org.

In the mix…democratizing access to data, data literacy, and predictable responses to proposed privacy bill

Friday, June 18th, 2010

1) Infochimps launched their API. People often ask, are you guys doing something similar?  Yes, in that we are also interested in democratizing access to data, but we’re focusing on a narrower area — information that’s too sensitive and too personal to release in the usual channels. In any case, we’re excited to see more movement in this direction.

2) Wikipedia began a trial of a new tool called “Pending Changes.” To deal with glaring inaccuracies and vandalism, Wikipedia made certain entries off-limits for off-the-cuff editing.  The trade-off, however, was that first-time editors to these articles couldn’t get that immediate thrill of seeing their edits.  Wikipedia’s trying out a compromise, a tab in which these edits are visible as “pending changes.”  It’s always fascinating to see all the different spaces in which people in a community can interact online — this is a new one.

3) The Info Law Group posted various groups’ reactions to the privacy bill proposed by Representative Rick Boucher. Here’s Part I, here’s Part II. Fairly predictable, but it still never ceases to amuse me how far apart industry groups are from consumer advocates.

4) Great discussion continues on the concept of “data literacy.” I love this guest post from David Eaves on the Open Knowledge Foundation blog, with the awesome line:

It is worth remembering: We didn’t build libraries for an already literate citizenry. We built libraries to help citizens become literate. Today we build open data portals not because we have a data or public policy literate citizenry, we build them so that citizens may become literate in data, visualization, coding and public policy.

In the mix…data for coupons, information literacy, most-visited sites

Friday, June 4th, 2010

1) There’s obviously an increasing move to a model of data collection in which the company says, “give us your data and get something in return,” a quid pro quo.  But as Marc Rotenberg at EPIC points out,

The big problem is that these business models are not very stable. Companies set out privacy policies, consumers disclose data, and then the action begins…The business model changes. The companies simply want the data, and the consumer benefit disappears.

It’s not enough to start with compensating consumers for their data.  The persistent, shareable nature of data makes it very different from a transaction involving money, where someone can buy, walk away, and never interact with the company again.  These data-centered companies are creating a network of users whose data are continually used in the business.  Maybe it’s time for a new model of business, where governance plans incorporate ways for users to be involved in decisions about their data.

2) In a related vein, danah boyd argues that transparency should not be an end in itself, and that information literacy needs to developed in conjunction with information access.  A similar argument can be made about the concept of privacy.  In “real life” (i.e., offline life), no one aims for total privacy.  Everyday, we make decisions about what we want to share with whom.  Online, total privacy and “anonymization” are also impossible, no matter the company promises in its privacy policy.  For our datatrust, we’re going to use PINQ, a technology using differential privacy, that acknowledges privacy is not binary, but something one spends.  So perhaps we’ll need to work on privacy and data literacy as well?

3) Google recently released a list of the most visited sites on the Internet. Two questions jump out: a) Where is Google on this list? and b) Could the list be a proxy for the biggest data collectors online?

In the mix — open data issues, bad econ stats, Facebook gaydar, and fraud detection in data

Friday, April 30th, 2010

1) It’s definitely become trendy for cities to open up their data, and I appreciated this article about Vancouver for its substantive points:

  • It’s important that data not only be open but be available in real time.  In all my conversations with people who work with data, though, whenever you have sensitive data, there’s going to be a significant time lag between when the data is collected and when it is “cleaned up” and made presentable for the public so as to avoid inadvertent disclosure.  This is why we think something like PINQ, a filter using differential privacy, could be revolutionary in making data available more quickly — it won’t need to be scrubbed for privacy reasons.
  • Licensing is an issue — although the city claims the data is public domain, there are terms of use that restrict use of the data by things like OpenStreetMaps.  It discusses the possibility of using the Public Domain Dedication and License, which is a project of Open Data Commons.  Alex heard some interesting discussion on this issue from Jordan Hatcher at the OkCon this past weekend.  This is a really fascinating issue, and I’m curious to see where else this gets picked up.

2) Existing economic statistics are riddled with problems.  I can’t say this enough — if existing ways of collecting and analyzing data are not quite good enough, we need to be open to new ones.

3) This is an old article, but highlights an issue Mimi and I have been thinking a lot about recently: How can data, even when shared according to your precise directions, reveal more than you intended? In this case, researchers found you could more or less determine the sexual orientation of people on Facebook based on their friends, even if they hadn’t indicated it themselves.  Privacy is definitely about control, yet how do you control something you don’t even know you’re revealing?

4) This past week, the Supreme Court heard a case involving the right to privacy of those who sign petitions to put initiatives on the ballot.  There is a lot of stuff going on in this case, gay rights, the experience of those in California who were targeted for supporting Prop 8, the difference between voting and legislating, etc., but overall, it’s a perfect illustration of how complicated our understanding of public and private has gotten.  We leave those lists open to scrutiny so we can prevent fraud — people signing “Mickey Mouse” — but public when you can go look at the list at the clerks’ office and public when you can post information online for millions to see are two different things.  There may be reasons we want to make these names public other than to prevent fraud (Justice Scalia thinks so), but are there other ways fraud could be detected among signatories that would not require an open examination of all petition signers’ names?  Could modern technology help us detect odd patterns, fake names and more without revealing individual identities?

In the mix…Google reveals how many government requests for data it gets, Amazon tries First Amendment privacy argument, and the World Bank opens its databases

Wednesday, April 21st, 2010

1) Google is providing data on how many government requests they get for data. As various people have pointed out, the site has its limitations, but it’s still fascinating.  We’ve been thinking a lot about how attractive our datatrust would be to governments, and how we can best deal with requests and remain transparent.  This seems like a good option and maybe something all companies should consider doing.

2) In related news, Amazon is refusing the state of North Carolina’s request for its customer data. North Carolina wants the names and addresses of every customer and what they bought since 2003!  They want to audit Amazon’s compliance with North Carolina’s state tax laws.  I think NC’s request is nuts–are they really prepared to go through 50 million purchases?  It may just be legal posturing, given Amazon already gave them anonymized data on the purchases of NC residents, but what’s really interesting to me is Amazon’s argument that its customers have First Amendment rights in their purchases.  I heard a similar argument at a talk at NYU a few months ago, that instead of arguing privacy rights, which are not explicitly defined in the Constitution, we should be arguing for freedom of association rights when we seek to protect ourselves from data requests like this.  Interesting to see where this goes.

3) The World Bank is opening up its development data. This is data people used to pay for and now it’s free, so it’s exciting news.  But as with most public data out there, it’s really just indicators, aggregates, statistics, and such, rather than raw data you can query in an open-ended way.  Wouldn’t that be really exciting?


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